Transhumanity
where strange brilliant ideas for the future intermingle and breed…

Home > Articles > Open Badges and Proficiency-Based Education: A Path to a New Age of Enlightenment

Open Badges and Proficiency-Based Education: A Path to a New Age of Enlightenment

Posted: Sun, March 10, 2013 | By: Gennady Stolyarov II



Badges 101 Badge

A major and tremendously promising opportunity has emerged to achieve a new Age of Enlightenment through technology and to enable large numbers of people to desire, seek out, and enjoy learning. Open Badges are an initiative spearheaded by Mozilla but made available to virtually any organization in an open-source, non-restrictive manner. Open Badges can make learning appealing to many by rewarding concrete and discrete achievements – whether it be mastering a skill, performing a specific task, participating in an event, meeting a certain set of standards, or possessing a valuable combination of “soft skills” that might otherwise go unrecognized.  But even beyond this, Open Badges allow for the portability of skill recognition in a manner that far outperforms the compartmentalization present in many of today’s formal institutions of schooling, accreditation, and employment. Individuals would no longer need to “prove themselves” anew every time they interact with a new institution.

Open Badges are still in their infancy, but you can begin participating in this exciting movement and earning your badges today. Based on the economic understanding of network effects, the more people actively use Open Badges, the more opportunities will become available through the system. An introduction to open badges (along with the opportunity to try out the system and earn several badges) can be found at OpenBadges.org. For a more detailed discussion, Dave Walter’s paper “Open Badges: Portable rewards for learner achievements” is recommended. (This paper, too, will enable you to earn a badge.)

 

Badge from MyKnowledgeMap
Badge from MyKnowledgeMap

Various organizations already issue badges. To immerse yourself in the earning of Open Badges, you will be able to find several introductory badges on the Badge Bingo page from Codery. For badges that can demonstrate some basic skills, the Mozilla Webmaker series enables earners to validate their basic HTML coding knowledge. For individuals and organizations seeking to issue their own badges, sites such as Credly offer an easy way to create and grant these awards.

 

Mozilla 'I am a Webmaker' Badge
Mozilla “I am a Webmaker” Badge

Mozilla Backpack can currently be used to host and share the badges, though other compatible systems also exist or are in development. Mozilla Backpack gives you the option to accept, reject, and classify badges into various “collections”. For instance, you can see a collection of all the Open Badges I have earned so far here, and a more skill-specific subset – all of my Mozilla Webmaker Badges – here. In a future world where badges will exist for a wide variety of competencies, one could imagine linking a prospective employer, business partner, educator, or online discussion partner to a page that documents one’s skills and knowledge relevant to the exchange being contemplated. Unlike a resume, whose value is unfortunately diminished by those dishonest enough to present falsehoods about their past, Open Badges are more robust, because they include metadata linking back to the issuer and containing a brief description of the criteria for earning the badge. Moreover, Mozilla Backpack offers you complete control over which badges you allow to be publicly visible, so you remain in control over what you emphasize and how.

Open Badges make possible a development I had anticipated and hoped to partake in for years: proficiency-based education. I have only known about Open Badges for less than a week at the time of writing this article. Serendipitously, I learned of their existence while reading “Ubiquity U: The Rise of Disruptive Learning” by Mark Frazier, and I was so intrigued that I embarked that same day on intensive research regarding Open Badges and the current status of their implementation. In the next several days, I strove to discover as many issuers of Open Badges as I could and to earn as many badges as I could feasibly obtain within a short timeframe.

However, my earlier writings have looked forward to the availability of this type of innovation. As a futurist, I take pride in having been able to accurately describe the future in this respect.

In February 2013, in “The Modularization of Activity” (here, here, and here), I wrote that “Education could be greatly improved by decoupling it from classrooms, stiff metal chair-desks, dormitories, bullies, enforced conformity, and one-size-fits-all instruction aimed at the lowest common denominator. The Internet has already begun to break down the ‘traditional’ model of schooling, a dysfunctional morass that our culture inherited from the theological universities of the Middle Ages, with some tweaks made during the mid-nineteenth century in order to train obedient soldiers and factory workers for the then-emerging nation-states. The complete breakdown of the classroom model cannot come too soon. Even more urgent is the breakdown of the paradigm of overpriced hard-copy textbooks, which thrive on rent-seeking arrangements with formal educational institutions. Traditional schooling should be replaced by a flexible model of certifications that could be attained through a variety of means: online study, apprenticeship, tutoring, and completion of projects with real-world impact. A further major breakthrough might be the replacement of protracted degree programs with more targeted ‘competency’ training in particular skills – which could be combined in any way a person deems fit. Instead of attaining a degree in mathematics, a person could instead choose to earn any combination of competencies in various techniques of integration, differential equations, abstract algebra, combinatorics, topology, or a number of other sub-fields. These competencies – perhaps hundreds of them in mathematics alone – could be mixed with any number of competencies from other broadly defined fields. A single person could become a certified expert in integration by parts, Baroque composition, the economic law of comparative advantage, and the history of France during the Napoleonic Wars, among several hundreds of relatively compact other areas of focus. Reputable online databases could keep track of individuals’ competencies and render them available for viewing by anyone with whom the individual shares them – from employers to casual acquaintances. This would be a much more realistic way of signaling one’s genuine skills and knowledge. Today, a four-year degree in X does not tell prospective employers, business partners, or other associates much, except perhaps that a person is sufficiently competent at reading, writing, and following directions as to not be expelled from a college or university.”

Even earlier, in 2008, I offered, as a starting point for discussion, an outline of my idea of proficiency-based education to PRAXIS, the Hillsdale College student society for political economy and economics. Below is my (very slightly expanded) outline. It pleases me greatly that the infrastructure to support my idea now exists, and I hope to contribute to its widespread implementation in the coming years.

Proficiency-Based Education: A Spontaneous-Order Approach to Learning

Outline by Gennady Stolyarov II from September 2008

The Status Quo

- Shortcomings of classroom-based education – “one size fits all”

- Shortcomings of course-based education – difficulty accommodating individual skills, interests, and learning pace. Grades lead to stigma of failure instead of iterative learning.

- Information problem of communicating one’s qualifications

- Negative cultural effects of segregating people by age and by generation – i.e., the “teen culture” generation gap

- Factory-based education system versus meaningful individualized education

Proficiency-Based Education

- Proficiencies replace courses.

- Proficiency levels replace grades.

- Proficiencies are easily visible and communicable to employers.

- Proficiencies are transferable by those who have them, up to their level of proficiency.

Emergence of Proficiency-Based Education

- Can be done privately by individuals or firms

- Can be done in person or on the Internet

- Can be done within and outside the university system

- Can be done for pay or for free

- People with proficiencies can pass the proficiencies on to their children/relatives/friends

- Incentives exist to restrict transfer of proficiencies to qualified persons.

- Networks of providers of Proficiency-Based Education can form. It will not be a centrally planned or directed system.

Advantages of Proficiency-Based Education

- Faster learning

- More individually tailored learning

- Ease of displaying one’s exact set of skills

- More hiring will be based on merit, since merit will be easier to see and verify.

- Indoctrination in politically or socially favored but objectively absurd notions will be much more difficult.

- The “teen culture” will disappear. Young people will be better integrated into adult society and will assume meaningful rights and responsibilities sooner.

- Proficiency-Based Education takes full advantage of all existing technologies, leading to a more technologically literate population with greater ability to control and improve the world.

- Greater integration of theory and practice and market selection of ideas that tend to bring about useful practical results

***

Open Badges provide the mechanism to coordinate the many thousands of competency-based or proficiency-based certifications and other achievements that I envision. While the processes leading to the demonstration of competency or accomplishment can be undertaken in any way that is convenient – online or in person – it is essential to have a universally usable digital system documenting and affirming the achievement. The system should be compatible with most websites and organizations and should not be locked down by “proprietary” protections. Proficiency-based education can only work if the educational platform is not inextricably attached to any particular provider of certifications, or else the very use of the proficiency system will remain compartmentalized and inapplicable to vast areas of human endeavor.

The free, open-source, and user-driven design of Open Badges provides exactly these desirable characteristics. At the same time, while Open Badges are free to create and issue, individual badges can be designed and offered by organizations that offer paid instruction – so that even traditional classes could be revolutionized by the introduction of competency-based elements, perhaps as a replacement for grades or, in the interim, as a mechanism for earning a grade. With the latter method, to get an “A” in a course or on a project, one would not need to pass a timed exam where every wrong answer constitutes a permanent reduction of one’s grade. Rather, one would need to earn certain kinds of badges demonstrating the completion of course objectives.

The motivational aspect of Open Badges stems from the immense engagement that is possible as a result of visible, incremental progress. This same motivating tendency explains the tremendous popularity of computer games. (Indeed, one initiative, 3D Game Lab, is developing an explicit educational computer game that will allow integration with coursework and Open Badges.) By enabling the earning of granular achievements (similar to “achievement” in a computer game), Open Badges keep learners focused on honing their skill sets and pursuing concrete objectives. At the same time, Open Badges facilitate creative approaches to learning and recognize the diversity of optimal individualized learning paths by leaving the choice of activities and their sequence entirely up to individual badge earners.

If billions of humans could become “addicted” to learning in the same way that some are said to be “addicted” to computer games, our civilization would experience a rapid transformation in a mere few years. Technological progress, institutional innovation, and the general level of human decency and morality would soar to unprecedented levels, at an ever-accelerating pace. Age-old menaces to our civilization, arising from pervasive human failings and institutional flaws, could finally be eradicated through vastly enhanced knowledge and a voluntary, enticing channeling of many people’s desires and enjoyments into highly productive paths that produce “positive externalities” (to use the jargon of economists). Open Badges, proficiency-based education, and the addition of game-based learning elements (up to and including full-fledged games, like the Mars Curiosity Activity from Starlite Digital Badges – just a hint of what is to come) can enable humankind to make decisive strides in its efforts to build up our civilization and beat back the forces of death, decay, and ruin.



Comments:

Ive been discussing this for a few years too, though not as much as you have. Im glad to know people that have a keen enough eye and enough attention and dedication to spotting out and working with these kinds of things. I’ve been contemplating ways that a person can submit what they think they know for grading and recording somewhere. I think this might be one of the top ten most important pieces of the infrastructure in the way forward to a progressively better world. Like you write, “If billions of humans could become “addicted” to learning in the same way that some are said to be “addicted” to computer games, our civilization would experience a rapid transformation in a mere few years.”

This reminds me of a badge like system for encouraging action too. Years ago, Ask Jeeves had a forum where many of the questions that people asked Jeeves would be sent for forum participants to answer. They would review 10 of your answers every so often and if 8 or more, I believe it was, were satisfactory then they would award the person participation stars by the week, month, year, lifetime, and maybe others but I forget all the details. We would fight for them and dedicate ourselves to answering as many questions well as we could. A system like this, it seems, has to be created for things like Facebook pages and groups. If people can be awarded for their participation then I am certain that activism and doing right and spreading great information and discussions will go through the roof.

By Eric Schulke on Mar 10, 2013 at 3:20pm

Eric,

Thank you for your comment! I am hopeful that life-extension initiatives (perhaps MILE itself) would be able to incorporate this idea in getting more people informed (both in terms of learning and in terms of activism). Perhaps educational modules and systems for taking action could be developed, with badges as rewards. Sites such as Credly and Badg.us have already arisen to provide ways for virtually anyone to create badges and award them based on specific qualification criteria.

By Gennady Stolyarov II on Mar 10, 2013 at 7:00pm

I find this article intriguing.
Is there any special significance or advantage in awarding badges to learners mastering certain field of knowledge and/or skills? Does getting a badge serve as intrinsic motivator?
If certificates or accreditation can be faked, why can’t badges?
Are badge awarders better educators and evaluators?    (btt1943)

By venze on Mar 11, 2013 at 8:55pm

Greetings, venze, and thank you for your comment. The badges can indeed be intrinsic motivators, but there is more. The badges are transferable verifications of competency in particular areas, whose authenticity can be easily checked because of the metadata embedded in each badge. Yes, there may be attempts at fakery, but they will be more difficult to execute than simply writing a lie on a resume. Badge awarders will vary in their qualifications, but this is true of all educational and accrediting institutions today. Badges from more reputable issuers will carry more weight with other parties.

By Gennady Stolyarov II on Mar 12, 2013 at 8:03pm


Leave a Comment:

Note We practice Buddhist Right Speech in our communication. All comments must be polite, friendly, and on topic.







What color is a blue sky?